Western Digital D50 Game NVMe docking station is a great way to utilize that Thunderbolt 3 port

Western Digital D50 Game NVMe docking station is a great way to utilize that Thunderbolt 3 port

Western Digital D50 Game NVMe docking station is a great way to utilize that Thunderbolt 3 port (Source: WD)

The all-in-one RGB-enabled docking station promises up to 3000 MB/s read and 2600 MB/s write rates all via Thunderbolt 3.

Users love to have Thunderbolt 3 on their PCs, but we’re willing to bet that most aren’t utilizing the port to its full potential. After all, not everyone wants to daisy chain multiple 4K displays or connect eGPUs.

The WD D50 docking station is a new option for users who want to make the most of their Thunderbolt 3 ports. Unlike most other docks, the D50 houses an optional M.2 NVMe SSD in addition to USB-A, RJ-45, full-size DisplayPort, 3.5 mm audio, and additional USB-C ports. One of the USB-C ports supports 87 W passthrough to recharge the laptop if needed which should prove useful for USB-C-powered laptops. The Dell XPS 13, for example, can connect to the D50 and also recharge simultaneously all through a single port on the chassis. The dock itself relies on an external 180 W AC adapter for power.

The 1 TB and 2 TB D50 SKUs are now shipping for $500 and $680 USD, respectively, with 5-year limited warranty as standard. Users uninterested in the SSD can opt for the SSD-less configuration for $320 USD. The M.2 SSD in the dock appears to be replaceable, but we can’t confirm at the moment if the SSD-less configuration can even support an internal M.2 drive at all.

Sale off now on Amazon – WD 12TB Elements Desktop Hard Drive, USB 3.0

Allen Ngo, 2020-10-22 (Update: 2020-10-23)

After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There’s a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I’m not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.

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